Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Texas-Statehood

Home
Blue Bell Creameries
Chili Cookoff
Colleges and Universities in Texas
Culture of Houston
Deep in the Heart of Texas
Don't Mess with Texas
Films set in Texas
Houston-Architecture
Houston-Climate
Houston-Geography
Houston-Geology
Houston-History
Houston-Murders and Disasters
Houston-Nicknames
Houston-Notable Buildings
Houston-Other Venues
Houston-Parks
Houston-Photographs
Houston-Reconstruction through 1900
Houston-Retail and Transportation
Houston-The Early 1900s
Houston-1920s
Houston-1930s
Houston-1940s
Houston-1950s
Houston-1960s
Houston-1970s
Houston-1980s
Houston-1990s
Houston-2000 to Present
Houston-Timeline of Historical Events
Houston-Texas
Houston-Turbulent Beginning
Langtry, Texas
Light of Saratoga
Ten Longest Texas Rivers
Lone Star Brewing Company
Major Waterways
Movies-Shows Take Place in Houston,Texas
Music of Texas
Notable German Texans
Seasonal and Restrictive Waterways
Sports Venues in Texas
State Fair of Texas
Television Shows Set in Texas
Texas
Texas-Actors
Texas and the Western Frontier
Texas Blues
Texas Country
Texas Country Music Hall of Fame
Texas Facts You May Not Know
Texas-Important Dates
Texas-Musical Groups
Major League Players from Texas
Texas Longhorn (cattle)
Texas-Photographs
Texas Railroads
Texas Recipes
Texas-Statehood
Wallpapers
Why Texas is the Best
World's Largest Texas Flag

On February 28, 1845, the U.S. Congress passed a bill that would authorize the United States to annex the Republic of Texas and on March 1 U.S. President John Tyler signed the bill. The legislation set the date for annexation for December 29 of the same year. On October 13 of the same year, a majority of voters in the Republic approved a proposed constitution that specifically endorsed slavery and the slave trade. This constitution was later accepted by the U.S. Congress, making Texas a U.S. state on the same day annexation took effect (therefore bypassing a territorial phase). One of the primary motivations for annexation was that the Texas government had incurred huge debts which the United States agreed to assume upon annexation. In the Compromise of 1850, in return for this assumption of $10 million of debt, a large portion of Texas-claimed territory, now parts of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Wyoming, was ceded to the Federal government.

 

The annexation resolution has been the topic of some incorrect historical beliefs—chiefly, that the resolution was a treaty between sovereign states, and granted Texas the explicit right to secede from the Union. This was a right argued by some to be implicitly held by all states at the time, and until the conclusion of the Civil War. However, no such right was explicitly enumerated in the resolution. That having been said, the resolution did include two unique provisions: first, it gave the new state of Texas the right to divide itself into as many as five states (a proposal never seriously considered). Second, Texas did not have to surrender its public lands to the federal government. Thus the only lands owned by the federal government within Texas have actually been purchased by the government, and the vast oil discoveries on state lands have provided a major revenue flow for the state universities.

Thanks for stopping by and y'all come back ya hear!